Ep 265 | Your Board's Role in Donor Stewardship with Sabrina Walker Hernandez

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Ready to supercharge your nonprofit's donor stewardship game? In this episode, we're joined by the amazing Sabrina Walker Hernandez, a board management guru with over 25 years of nonprofit experience. Sabrina dishes out practical tips on how to engage your board in donor stewardship, from thank-you taskforces to creative cultivation strategies. Whether you're a seasoned pro or just starting out, this episode is packed with actionable advice to help you retain donors and maximize your board's impact.

What you'll learn:

→ Why donor stewardship is crucial for nonprofit boards
→ Practical strategies for involving board members in stewardship
→ How to create a culture of gratitude within your organization
→ Tips for developing a comprehensive stewardship plan
→ Ways to leverage board members' strengths in fundraising efforts

Want to skip ahead? Here are key takeaways:

[6:23] The fundraising process breakdown: Sabrina reveals that 60% of fundraising is relationship cultivation, 15% is stewardship, and only 5% is actually asking for money. This insight helps shift focus from the “ask” to building and maintaining donor relationships.
[13:09] Leadership Mindset Shift: Instead of lamenting that “my board won't fundraise,” Sabrina encourages nonprofit leaders to ask, “How can I better lead and educate my board?” This perspective change empowers CEOs to take responsibility for board engagement and success.
[24:46] Donor Care at All Levels: Sabrina shares a story about a wealthy donor who would test organizations with small initial donations. This emphasizes the importance of treating all donors with equal care and respect, regardless of gift size.
[28:29] Implement a “five by five” plan: This practical strategy involves assigning each board member five donors to steward, with a goal of five meaningful touchpoints throughout the year. This structured approach helps ensure consistent donor engagement.
[35:33] Leveraging Board Strengths: Sabrina stresses the importance of focusing on board members' individual strengths. A board member who excels at stewardship and cultivation can be incredibly valuable, even if they're not comfortable directly asking for money.

Resources

Visit Supporting World Hope for Sabrina's social media platforms, services, and to join her VIP resource library.

Listen to episode 172 where Sabrina and Sami discuss Utilizing Your Board in You Marketing Efforts.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez

Sabrina Walker Hernandez

President/CEO, Supporting World Hope Coaching & Consulting, LLC

Sabrina Walker Hernandez has over 25 years of experience in nonprofit management, fundraising, and leadership. She grew her operation revenue from $750,000 to $2.5M and completed a $12M capital campaign. She is certified in Nonprofit Management by Harvard Business School and a bestselling author.

Learn more at https://supportingworldhope.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_nonprofitexpert
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/supportingworldhope

9 Creative Ways to Engage and Steward Your Donors pdf

Download our Guide: 9 Creative Ways to Engage and Steward Your Donors

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Full Transcript

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Managing and creating great board structure is super important. And having your board support you and the things that you need them to do is also super important. And today we're talking with Sabrina Walker Hernandez because she is my go to expert when it comes to boards, board management, and how to get things done today specifically, talking about how we can engage our board in stewardship of our donors. Sabrina Walker Hernandez has over 25 years of experience in nonprofit management, fundraising and leadership, she grew her operation revenue from $750,000 to 2.5 million and completed a $12 million capital campaign. She is certified in nonprofit management by Harvard Business School, and is a best selling author. She has been on the podcast before and she always comes with an amazing wealth of knowledge. So I'm really excited to have her back here again, talking specifically about donor stewardship. retaining those donors is something amazing that we can all be doing better at in all parts of our job, but she has some great tactical hands on things to consider in order to get the most out of your board, making them feel like the heroes that they are and maximizing the fact that they said yes to be on your board and work for your organization. I apologize in advance, we had some technical difficulties. So we don't have video for this episode. And I really wish that we did. But we don't. And so today, it's an audio only version. So if you're watching us over on YouTube, I apologize that we don't have that today. But it's great content, great information for you to lean on. And I know in episode you'll be coming back to again and again. But before we get into it, this episode is brought to you by our July freebie, which is nine ideas for stewarding your donors ways to really jump in and engage and excite your donors on the things that you're doing. Sabrina had some great ideas in this episode as well. But grab that guide at thefirstclick.net/resources so that you can learn some new ways that you might want to stand out from the crowd and build your stewardship plan. Again, you can grab that at thefirstclick.net/265. Let's get into the episode.

Intro
You're listening to the digital marketing therapy podcast. I'm your host, Sami Bedell-Mulhern. Each month we dive deep into a digital marketing or fundraising strategy that you can implement in your organization. Each week, you'll hear from guest experts, nonprofits, and myself on best practices, tips and resources to help you raise more money online and reach your organizational goals.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Hey, friends, please join me in welcoming Sabrina Walker Hernandez to the podcast again, Sabrina, thank you so much for being here.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Thank you for having me excited to have this conversation.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah. And I before we kind of jump into our specific topic today, I would love for you to just kind of share why boards like why is board something that you love talking about and supporting nonprofits in really building?

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Yeah, I get that question a lot. And so the the answer to that is really they said yes, I take it from a perspective of that they are good people who said yes. They said yes to time away from their family. They said yes to volunteering. They said yes to giving back. And so they are saying yes. Right. So good people. And now our job is to make sure when they say yes, that we educate them, that we lean into their strengths that we allow them to shine in the capacity in which they are saying yes.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
I love that. And we had you on episode 172. We'll link that up in the show notes previously to talk really about like how to leverage your board with your marketing activities. And one of the things that I love about you is yes, they said yes, but that doesn't mean that they are all great at the same things. And so I'm really excited today to talk about donor stewardship, because I think we so often talk about how do we go and get our board out to fundraise and make money for us that we forget that there's this like huge chunk in retaining the existing donors that we have. So why do you think donor stewardship is such an important role for the board to play in?

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
It's very important Look, when people think fundraising, they think I'm asking for money, but really and truly stewardship is the second largest piece of the fundraising path. Right? So in order for me to do a job as the CEO, it can be very overwhelming. I did it for 20 years. And so for me, I was told and I learned that if you take care of the money and you take care of the board, you will be fine. But we know we have staff we know we have facility issues we have partners or things come up and we're putting out fires. So I had to retrain myself to think of two, I put a formula to fundraising. Right? So 10% of fundraising is really identifying another 10% is qualifying. So that means, here's the people that can give, or here's companies that can give, just identify them, then you have to qualify them, right? You have to say, okay, just because they give doesn't mean they're going to give to my organization, are they passionate about my mission? are they passionate about what we do? And then 60% of fundraising is cultivating, that's building the relationship. And then 5% is asking for money. And then 15% is stewardship, which is saying thank you. So that is maintaining the relationship, right. And what we tend to do is we put more weight in that 5%. But if you can get your board to focus on that 60, and that 15, that's 75% of fundraising. So your board has a huge role that they can play in stewardship, which is fundraising, the second biggest piece of the pie.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
I love that breakdown. And it makes so much sense. But it kind of leads directly to, I think, an innate fear that organizations and development staff have in who's maintaining that relationship. So if we put more of that on the board to maintain the rootlet relationship, if that board member leaves, that money walks with them, so how can we kind of balance that relationship with board members helping us with stewardship as well as the staff managing it and kind of keeping those long term? donors?

Sabrina Walker Hernandez 
That's a very good question. So again, I was in my organization for 20 years, the CEO that was there before me was there for 30 years. So that's 50 years of history, right. And we have relationships with our donors. But we did, I did very strategic things when it came to stewardship, and board and relationships. So here's what I did, I just gonna give some practical tips that worked for me. And you know, you have to look at models that work for you. So I had every board meeting, I ended the board meeting, passing out a two card note cards, and an a script. So the board members didn't even have to kind of think about what to write. And so they would write, they would write the card out, not address it to anyone, and they would sign their name, I would collect those cards and those pens, because I gave him the pens too, because I found that funny given the pins, and I was going to have different ink colors. And the whole point is collect those cards, put them on your desk. And when the gift comes in, you add the donors name and you add your signature block, and you mail it out. So now this person is getting a handwritten thank you card from the board member and the CEO for their gift, and they're getting it within that 24 hour rule. So that's one way that I was able to do that. For major gifts. I had a thank you Taskforce, it was three board members. You know, the board members you can rely on that says if they're going to do this, they're going to do this. So it was three board members when a major gift came in. Now, somebody might be saying, well, what's a major gift for every organization is different, right? Yeah.

A major gift is the check that you get in the mail that makes you squeal, and you want to go tell somebody. That's the major gift for your organization. So at the time when we started this, a major gift was was $500. Right? It kind of grew over time. But at that moment, at the when we began it was $500. So I had a task force of three. And when a major gift came in, I would email one of the task force members and I would say this gift came in at this amount. And here's their cell phone number. If I had access to that, or their number, can you call them and say thank you. And they did. So that was another way that we did it. Another way that we did it was 20 minutes of every board meeting we did a board education. And so with Board education. Not all the time, but at least once a Year, I would walk in with our top donors or someone who had given like $1,000 or more. And each board members get five names. And we would spend 20 minutes in the board meeting, calling to say thank you because I couldn't get, look, I know the strengths and weaknesses, I knew the strengths and weaknesses. So I couldn't say, here's the five names and just give it to the board member and say, do it, right? No, we did it as a collective activity. And what happened is, a lot of times, they got voicemails, and they left the voicemails, but there was always a time where someone spoke to someone, and we will reconvene back. And they would share that that person was so excited that they got a call that they never get a call, thanking them randomly out of the blue for the support of the organization. So those were the ways because we have CEOs, we were so entrenched, you know, 2030 years, 20 years, those are the ways that we chose to incorporate our board and in stewardship, right.

There's other ways to, you know, first time donor packets, are you sending out first time donor packets. And if you are sending out first time donors, donor packets, this is a good way to get board members to do a thank you letter that you know, can be put in the first time donor packet. So you have to be very intentional about how you incorporate donors in that process is not about your board, you also have to educate board members because my board members understood wherever they were in their strengths, that the whole goal was their lending their credibility to the organization. And so in that, if they introduced us to a donor, that they updated that donor about the organization, but not only updated that owner about the organization, they also I had a board member, Milly and she would say, hey, he eats breakfast every morning at this restaurant, you know, and so he would tell me that little Intel kind of thing. And I would be like, Okay, I'm gonna go have breakfast there. So you have to make sure that you educate your board members. Be be specific with them. Right, yeah, let them know, it's the fear or this is my concern. And you're laying your credibility to me, I also as an organization, want to develop a relationship with the individual? Because, look, our track history shows that development directors only last about a year and a half to two years and organization. That's so you need to donors need to have a relationship with the organization. Yeah, hope the answer's

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
no, there are so many good things to unpack there. And one of the things that I want to mention first is your your very specific tasks that people can accomplish and doing that in the board meeting or, you know, having them write cards like that makes everybody's life easier. But it's done in a way that doesn't seem like extra work. And that goes back to what you said at the very beginning where your passion for helping boards is because they said yes to something. And so how can we validate that for them in a way that also makes them feel valued. You know, even if they can't bring in a big donor, or they don't have all those connections, like in those meetings, you're giving them something very tangible that they can do, where they can say, I know I'm helping make an impact for this organization. So I think that's brilliant, and I think can definitely remove all that fear because you're you're asking them to do specific tasks. You're not asking them to manage the relationship, but but they're helping you in managing those relationships. That yes,

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
yes. And also, I'm not judging them based on their fear of the five, which is 5% is asking for money. It's like, okay, I get it. At the end of the day, my mentality was, I am the CEO of the organization. I did not have a development person at the time. I think I got a development person my last five years in the organization, and I didn't even know what to do with them. I'll be very honest. I ran them off. I ran off my first one. And my second one, because I was so used to doing it myself. I'll be honest, I I have my growth moments as well. So I think if you are the CEO of the organization, and if your board is it is in strength is cultivation, which I absolutely love. They lean into that strength. And then when it comes to making the ask, which is only 5% of the final raising, you go with them to that meeting with a major donor or what have you and you say, you utter this the phrase, will you consider it an investment of $10,000 in our organization? So, I, I know there are a lot of I was not the CEO who had that fear of asking I mean, what is the worst that can happen? They say no, it's okay. No, it's not a personal rejection. It's a no, not at this time. No, not this program. No, until I asked, you know, my spouse, or that's what it is, it is what it is. And for every No, you have to hear no to get to the Yes. So I was not afraid of that, as long as I trained my board, on what it meant to cultivate and steward relationships, because that was the key.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
i Sorry, I think we might have, I might have lost that last part of

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
what you said. Okay, you want me repeat it?

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, especially where just start with like, where you train your board.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
So here's the thing, I think that you have to train your board on what it means to cultivate and to steward. Because what you do to get them is what you do to keep them and you don't have to worry about as a CEO. Well, the reason why I was successful as a CEO, is I didn't judge them by that 5% of asking, it took me a long time to get there. I was one of those frustrated CEOs who say my board won't fund raise, my board won't do this, until one of my mentors slapped me around and said, your board is waiting on you. 

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Okay, oh, that's amazing. 

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Yeah, it was like it was so releasing for me, for him to say your board is waiting on you, you got to be specific with them, you have to realize what fundraising is, and focus the energy on what you can educate them on and get them to be involved with, and everybody is not going to be a asker. And it's okay, if that is your job. And as soon as I owned that, it freed me so much. And I know a lot of people and a lot of boards and a lot of CEOs, again, they're not comfortable with making the ask. And then they go out and they hire these development directors. And they say, oh, okay, I don't have to fundraise anymore, we hired this person to do it. And that's not, that's not right. It is a team. And every team member plays their position. The CEO is the visionary in the face of the organization. The board members bring the credibility, and then the development director is the coordinator of all those pieces. So you cannot expect one person to carry the organization. Board members absolutely need to be involved in fundraising. But it's not always asking. If you can get them involved in stewardship and cultivation, you will, you will see a major difference.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
So good. Um, okay, so I want to break it down. And let's assume we're because you you, as you mentioned, your success in in doing this with your organization, you had a lot of history, if we are a newer organization, or maybe we've had a lot of transition on our board, or we're kind of in a new strategic phase of our organization. And the stewardship piece has become a bigger priority, which it should be for everybody. How can we get started with kind of adding that culture into our board or creating what that plan might be so that they can be a part of it? Like, where should we begin?

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Yeah, so stewardship, what are you began? So here's the some assumptions that I'm going to make and some best practices that I'm going to make if you have an annual retreat, board retreat, right. This is something that can be a topic in your board retreat, developing a stewardship plan, and what that looks like, and what everybody's willing to do, and you agree upon, right. So there is stewardship plans that you can do As a new nonprofit, right? That's not based on relationships. Now, I'm gonna give you this, but the best practice is to base it on relationships. But I've sat in that seat when I didn't have a stewardship plan. And I wanted to get started. So here goes, Okay, now remember, I'm just getting you started on this one. So and this is something someone else share with me. For every zero, that's a touch. So if someone gives 10 to $99, that's one zero. So they get one touch, which is the Thank You card. In my world, to get a thank you card. Remember, I got my board members writing thank you cards all day. So they get a thank you card. If they give $100 to $999, that's two zeros. So they get a thank you card, and maybe a video, thank you making this up as I go. If they give three zeros, you know, they give $1,000 to 9999. Girl, the math be mapping over here, that's 30 zeros. So that's three touches, that will be a card of video, and then maybe they get added to the newsletter list, I don't know, then you know, four zeros, that's four touches five zeros that's five touches. So then you build the plan based off the number of zeros, right? That's based off the money, that's a quick one, if you don't have anything that gets you started, here's where the real gold is. The real gold is when you sit down and you really develop your stewardship plan based on relationships. So that's a little bit different, then that is regardless of the amount, your first time donors, they get a first time donor packet. That first time donor packet will have you know, a token gift, not a swag gift, not no pin with your logo on it. It's gonna be something that reminds them of the mission, I was very lucky, I served in a youth development organization. So it was always like a painting from the kids or you know, something from the kids. And then it can I jump in there

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
with another example for something like that, too. So a client of mine works in mental health care space with kids, and one of the things that they give away are little fidget rings. So there that you can use to reduce anxiety and stress. And, you know, adults can use them, kids can use them, and they're easy to ship. You know, they're small, and they're super cheap. And they and they go with a card that tells them how to use it and how we use it in therapeutic sessions with with the kids that they're working with so, so exactly exactly what you're saying. You're directly related to a tactical thing that they can actually use to get results for themselves as well. Yep.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
And every time they fidgeting with that ring or see that ring to think of your organization, you put a nice letter in there welcome welcoming them to the family. And you can if you have an annual report, put the annual report or there are any marketing collateral that's every first time donor to your organization, whether they gave $5 or $10,000, you send that right. And then the next level is, you know, there is software out there that allows you to send them a personalized video with their name. So it's more about really developing that relationship. It could be if they give this much, then we're going to take them out to lunch. So you really build that plan based on personal interactions and connections to set yourself apart. So and that piece, that plan is what I would take and make a centerpiece of a board retreat and walk out with a plan that's based on relationship.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, so that taskforce that you mentioned earlier, like the three people that you know, you can count on to deliver those those board members could also be the ones creating some of those. Thank you personalized thank you videos as well, right? Yes, yeah.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Yeah, and that came out of a board retreat. Yeah. Task Force came out of a board retreat for us. So it works. You know, sometimes people have retreats and there's no purpose to them or no fault. Listen to them, they're just doing it because, you know, this is what we've always done. But every retreat that you have, look at where your gaps are and where you need to strengthen and make that the theme or the centerpiece of the retreat, and walk out with a stewardship plan, if you don't have a stewardship plan, where all your board members can buy into it, because they were part of developing the plan, don't just walk in and say, here's the plan, now you're responsible for and they need to have buying.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, agreed. Okay, so just to kind of recap that, because so much goodness there, if you just want to get started, start with the zeros, and just put a plan in place and get going. But then, you know, graduate into this more relationship building, I love that you said it doesn't matter what their price is, because I or what's in prices, what their gift size is, because I automatically think about like our monthly donors, and, and making sure that we're really nurturing and building that base, as well. And also that, you know, we don't know the potential value that a new donor might be able to give to us, or the relationships or the network that they have. And so I think by treating everybody the same, within reason, right, with within the capacity that you have within your board and your staff, I think it's something that a lot of organizations could really do a better job of.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Yeah, I agree. And you said something that triggered a memory, I had a top donor who was very capable of giving a lot of money. But his test was every organization that he was interested in, he was sent $25 first to see how he was going to be treated. And then if if you sent that student, you know, you sent that thank you card, you know, you reached out that let him know that your your systems were good, you had it together. And he will look at you a second time. But if you he spent $25, and you spelled his name wrong, oh, that was one of his pet peeves, like you spelled his name wrong. Or you didn't send a thank you card like it took you months, or didn't send one at all, you basically know invoice his his investment in your organization? Yeah. So

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
that's so good and so true, you don't really understand the capacity that people have. Because even if they have a high financial capacity, and you know that that doesn't mean that they care deeply about the cars that you're like, you still need to work for that. And I think building these things, and consistency over time is super helpful. So I wanted to ask just one clarifying question with regards to the first example that you talked about with the stewardship plan. And, and the touch points. You know, if we're giving somebody three touch points, or 10, touch points, how important is it for us to make sure that those are happening throughout the year? Do they all happen right away? You know, so. And on top of that, if we're including our board and some of these stewardship pieces do we have? Is it important that the same board member be following up with the same donor? Or is it okay, if in those kinds of conversations or meetings when they're making phone calls, it could be a variety of people making those touch points throughout the year?

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Well, here you go. I'm a Systems girl. So take this with the I'm a system girl, and it worked for me. So we my board. We had accounts, right? And so basically, each board member had five people that they were responsible for cultivating them and stewarding them and touching them five times in a year. So we call it the five by five plan is something I learned along the way going to conferences and interacting with other, you know, professionals. And so that five by five plan became one of our tools. And so if Sami, Sabrina, you know, Susie, Mike and Paul were my accounts, then it was my responsibility as a board member to make sure that I touched them at least five times in the year. And so the touches could be picking up the phone to call them or you know, it could be that you know, they are a part of my regular day or life or whatever it is right. But it's having that intentionality to mention the organization to them. Throughout, you know, it can make be making sure that they get invited to an event, and not necessarily a special event where, you know, it could be like a house party, or a volunteer opportunity of that nature. So it could be inviting them in for tour, or asking them to speak because I again, I work with kids. So some of our stewardship points, we're inviting them into one of the best things that I ever did, and I loved this, it was we would invite potential donors and those that we were stewarding to come in, and talk to our kids and give them advice that they wish they had at 12 years old. So, from that, that was a huge stewardship opportunity, because they would come in, and will be a panel for they will share their advice, there was tears to be had. Because you know, you're looking at, you're saying, This is what I learned in this course. And then it went into with our kid, giving them a tour of our facility. Right? So my board was very conscious and doing those things, but they have five people that they needed to ensure it was touched five times throughout the year.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Well, and I think Sabrina, this is something really important to pull out of that is, again, like how can we be creative and be mission driven. And also give our board members the way away to be a hero and feel successful, like what a cool thing to be able to say to one of your five, that you're in charge of, to say, Hey, I've got this really cool opportunity for you to just share some of your knowledge with these kiddos like that's such a great lead in for a different conversation, you know, setting them up for ways that they can interact in a meaningful way is just going to help make sure that those actions happen. Like if I'm sitting down, and I'm like, Oh, I have to contact these five donors five times a year, and I have no idea what to say or what to do or whatever. You're likely not going to get that action. Right.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Right. But I think you have to be very specific, again, like here are opportunities where your five year accounts can come in, we had a Youth of the Year competition we had, where they can come in and talk about, you know, themselves at 12. We had opportunities where they could come in and talk about financial literacy we had. And so we will share those different opportunities and say, Okay, who can you invite? Yeah, you know, and here's those opportunities, and it just makes life easier for them to be successful. Look, again, they said, Yes, they want to be said, they said, Yes, they want to have an impact. And oftentimes, what happens is, we were not given them the opportunity to have impact. And so a lot of people, a lot of board members come in with their assumptions of what a board member is. And when you have people work from their assumptions, you can get micromanaging board members, you can get board members that you know, sometimes you get board members that are bullies, you're going to do it this way, or no way. Because I get my money here, you can get board members that refuse to, I will say fundraise the dirty F word, which is not the way I look at fundraising. So you have to make sure that you are being intentional, and educating your board members on what it means to be a board member. And not only that, setting them up for success. And you can't be you know, I had someone say, Well, I emailed them and they don't email back. They don't check their emails and okay, this is what I say. I serve on several boards, and two of those are fundraising boards. And if you're judging me by the fact that I don't check my emails, I'm gonna be a bad board member to you. Because emails overwhelming. And so again, it goes about leaning into their strengths, of if it's urgent for me, text me, right, I'll get a text quicker than I will email. So if you are insistent upon communicating with your board, on email, everybody the same, then you're going to get, you're not going to get the results that you want. And so you have to understand that again. Creating plans, making them feel success. For giving them scripts, leaning into their strengths is really where you're going to have your success. And Stewardship can be one of those places where they can really shine. And you have to, you have to have know the value of stewardship. Right? Sometimes we put so much value in, oh, they asked for money. So that's the board member I want. But man, if you get a board member that's good at stewardship and cultivation. They're, they're worth their weight in gold.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern 
Yeah, well, Sabrina, what I love so much when you come is you bring such like, tactical things, like a lot of the things that you mentioned can be implemented tomorrow, some are gonna take a little bit more work depending on your board and the culture of your board or when your annual retreat is, but still very, very, like specific things that we can start to do to improve this. So I love that if people want to connect with you, because you have so much, I mean, I love when you talk about gamification, for boards for how you can encourage engagement. I love you know, your fundraising conversations around your marketing conversations about how we can make the most of our boards. So you're a wealth of knowledge. We could probably talk boards all day long. But if people want to kind of connect with you, and learn about how you support organizations, and take advantage of some of your incredible resources, how do they do that? Yeah,

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
one call to action, www.supportingworldhope.com. If you go to my website, you can connect with me from my social media platforms there, see my services, and even join my VIP resource library where I have free documents around board around fundraising around policies and marketing.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern 
Yeah, and like I said, we'll link up episode 172 in the shownotes, where Sabrina talked about utilizing your board in your marketing efforts. And we will also link up everything in the show notes as well at thefirstclick.net/265. But Sabrina, this was a pleasure. As always, I always love our conversation. So thank you so much for coming back to the podcast.

Sabrina Walker Hernandez
Thank you. I've enjoyed our conversation.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Well, I think that was an amazing episode, we probably could have talked for hours, Sabrina has such great insights. And I hope that you will pick one of her two paths, right, whether you're ready to uplevel, and really dive deep into donor stewardship with your board or if you're just at the beginning stages, no matter where you are in your organization. There's resources here for you in this episode. And then you can grab the show notes at thefirstclick.net/265. I'll also link to the other episode we did on marketing at thefirstclick.net/172 If you want to go straight there. Otherwise, make sure you subscribe wherever you're listening and leave us that review so that we can get more visibility and get in front of more organizations that also need the support. I also encourage you to share this episode with any board members that you think could be inspired by the work they can do on the stewardship side of your organization get their wheels turning and get some juices flowing. Thank you so so much for taking the time to listen to this episode. I hope you find it valuable, and I can't wait to see you in the next one.

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