Ep 258 | Do You Need to Refresh Your Website? with David Pisarek

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Building a website is big and can be super stressful. Once it's done, the unfortunate thing is that it's not done! As your business grows and evolves, your website should do the same alongside it. Sometimes its quick and simple changes, sometimes its a big overhaul. If this is on your radar then give this episode a listen so you can be more thoughtful about your approach, budgets, and time.

What you'll learn:

→ how your goals play into your website.
→ the role data plays into your decisions.
→ looking outside your organization for different perspectives.
→ ways to organize all your pages.

Want to skip ahead? Here are key takeaways:

[6:24] Start with your goals and mission of your organization. Your website should reflect those goals. Match that with your website analytics. Are the pages that connect the most with those goals the ones that people are visiting? Ensure that those core pages you need are getting the right activity and attention.
[14:06] Get outside perspectives for how people utilize your website. Getting outside of your own internal perspectives is a great way to understand what to update on your website. You might access things a certain way, but that doesn't mean that it's easy for other people to find the information. Interview some people to see if they can access the elements that are critical for conversions.
[17:47]Build a spreadsheet that has all the pages of your website listed. Remove anything that's old, isn't relevant, or doesn't get any traffic. This is a great spring cleaning activity to build into your regular website updates.
[28:04] Figure out your timeline. It doesn't have to be done all at once. Think about the priorities and phase out the steps to fit into your schedule.

Resources

Website (re)Design Workbook
Free Consult with Wow Digital
[eBook] 3 Simple Words to Increase Your Donations by 20%

David Pisarek

David Pisarek

Founder, Memory Fox

Meet David, a tech guru and passionate advocate for non-profits. Since 2000, David has been harnessing the power of technology to drive social change. He's not only the founder of Wow Digital, a digital agency focused on empowering non-profits, but also a seasoned educator in systems, coding, and UX/UI design. Known for his strategic acumen, David notably saved a hospital over $50,000 annually through IT innovations.

Outside the office, David is an avid hockey player and family man, constantly exploring the latest technology. As a mentor, he guides agencies toward profitability and growth, having already helped over 220 agencies worldwide.

David's ultimate mission? To empower 5,000 nonprofits to impact 10 million lives through digital innovation, inspiring positive change across humanity.

Learn more at https://wowdigital.com 

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We love creating the podcast. If you like what you learned here please give us a tip and help us offset our production costs.

When you leave a review it helps this podcast get in front of other nonprofits that could use the support. If you liked what you heard here, please leave us a review.

Full Transcript

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Whether you've had your website for six months, or you've had your website for six years, sometimes we look at them and we say, Is this the best that it can be? And we probably want to make changes to our website along the way, especially as our business grows, evolves, changes, priorities, change, goals change all of the things. Myself, we did a huge overhaul of both the H & E Marketing Solutions and the first clicks websites in early 2023. Because it just didn't feel like it matched our vibe and our audience anymore. Now, throughout the years, we have made minor changes to the website. But a big overhaul really only happens for us every two to three years. I don't know when the last time was that you had an overhaul. But if you've been thinking about making some changes to your website, updating it or just making sure that you're in a different technology set, that's easier to use, because tech is changing all the time. This episode is for you.

Meet my guest, David Pisarek. He is a tech guru and passionate advocate for nonprofits. Since 2000, David has been harnessing the power of technology to drive social change. He's not only the founder of wild digital, a digital agency focused on empowering nonprofits, but also a seasoned educator in systems coding UX UI design, known for his strategic acumen, David notably saved the hospital over $50,000 annually through it innovations. outside the office. David is an avid hockey player, family man and constantly exploring the latest technology. As a mentor, He guides agencies towards profitability and growth, having already helped over 220 agencies worldwide, David's ultimate mission to empower 5000 nonprofits to impact 10 million lives through digital innovation, inspiring positive changes across humanity. We have a lovely conversation about websites, you know, I love talking about websites, I geek out on them. So it was fun to have this conversation with somebody who's also in the same space as me, I think you're really going to enjoy this. And if you've been thinking about, you know, should it should you start updating your website, this is definitely a conversation for you. Even if it's not something that you've been thinking about doing. If it's been some time since you've made updates, definitely check this out.

But before we get into it, this episode is brought to you by our May freebie, this is all about your donation page on your website, how can you have the best donation page possible, right, that's what we're sharing a checklist and a guide to kind of allow you to review what you're working on what you've got on the page, make some updates, make some changes, tweak it, refine it, or maybe just get the validation that you've got going on and your donation page is looking great. Regardless, you can get this and all of our other resources at the first click.net/resources. This guide is up at the top for you to make it easy for you to grab as one of our featured freebies. And if you know of anybody who could also use some support with their donation plate the donation page, please send it to them as well so they can check it out and get the support that they need as they're going into their fundraising campaigns this year. For now, let's get into the episode.

Intro
You're listening to the digital marketing therapy podcast. I'm your host, Sami Bedell-Mulhern. Each month we dive deep into a digital marketing or fundraising strategy that you can implement in your organization. Each week, you'll hear from guest experts, nonprofits, and myself on best practices, tips and resources to help you raise more money online and reach your organizational goals.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Hey, friends, please join me in welcoming David Pisarek to the podcast. David, thank you so much for being here today.

David Pisarek
My pleasure. Thanks for having me. Hi, everybody.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, and we're talking websites, which is something we both love. So this is going to be a super fun conversation. I'm excited about it. But I want to just kind of kick it off with just kind of asking you your thoughts around, you know, websites, some of some of us have had them since early 2000s and haven't touched them. Some of us have had, you know, like 15 different iterations because one board member volunteered to do it. And then somebody else volunteered to make some updates. And now here we are with this like, jumbled mess. So we all kind of have our pain points with websites, but kind of where do you see the importance of having a good quality website living these days as part of our nonprofit kind of online fundraising marketing strategy?

David Pisarek
So totally loaded question there. Like how do you know right? And I think that what we need to shift people's minds around is that a website is think of think of it as like an employee for your organization that's working for you 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We want to hire the best employees we can to help with our marketing efforts, our fundraising efforts, the website is a very similar thing, right? We need it to showcase the organization in the best light possible, talk about those impact stories to engage emotional, emotional, wet, emotional connection with people to get them to care about your cause. Right? Ultimately leading them to share some content you have better yet getting to volunteer, or provide some time or even better donate some money so that you can continue to do the work and create the impact that you do in your communities.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
That was a perfect answer, I think and so true, I love thinking about I'm the same I love thinking about your website as another employee, that's working all the time for you. Because done right, it can absolutely do that. So if we're looking at our website, gonna give you another just kind of loaded question. But if we're looking at our website, and we're like, you know, it doesn't look that great, or it doesn't do like anybody's doing anything. I feel like we make a lot of decisions based off of opinion. And I know, we're going to talk about how we kind of start the process of thinking about a redesign. But before we even jump into that, you know, there's always a conversation about design versus messaging, like it has to look beautiful. Or it needs to sound good, but kind of what are your thoughts on how we kind of take both of those things into consideration before we even jump into the actual redesign?

David Pisarek
They can a strategic strategic approach to it, I think what we need to do is think about what is the goal and the mission of the organization? Does the website actually portray that when somebody lands on your site, I would say if you look at your analytics, but we'll dig into analytics, I think in a little bit as well. But if you look at your analytics, there's likely only about 40% of your traffic that lands on your homepage. Right? So what are those other top pages in your site that that you've got? And to those pages, there's probably only maybe about a dozen pages actually, that get maybe 80 85% of your web traffic. To those pages, tell the story of the organization to those pages, clearly articulate what it is that your goal is how you want to help the way you help. Right, let's make sure that we can be clear on on what the actual mission of the organization is, before we even think about what you know what it is. I know a lot of organizations they might have started, you know, two years ago, they might have started 5060 years ago, or priorities of organizations shift over time. Let's get to the root of it. Right? Why was it founded? Are you still on that track on that path? And how can we talk about it?

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, well, because I think that's great, because clarity in being concise, and that is going to help people make those decisions. We've had a lot of conversations lately on this podcast about kind of decision fatigue, and making people work too hard to understand either what you need them to do or what how you solve a problem for them. So I think I love that you've mentioned kind of going back to even if you're only been around for two years, like are we still doing exactly this? Or do we need to update the messaging to make it more clear. So I think that's fantastic. But let's jump into the analytics. Because you know, if you're considering refreshing your website, or doing a full on change, you know, it's a great place to start. But it can be overwhelming to people that don't live in Google Analytics. So kind of, what do we want to look at? Or how do we kind of use those analytics to make decisions about what pages maybe we start with? Or what pages we even maybe get rid of?

David Pisarek
First thing that I'd like everybody to do is just be honest with yourself for a moment. What is the last time you actually looked at your analytics, right? Do you have analytics on your site? Maybe you do. Maybe you don't. Google Analytics this past year in July made a shift. So they went from UA three, Universal Analytics three to GA for Google Analytics, four. If you haven't made that transition yet, make sure that you go ahead and do that right now. If you need help with that, get in touch with me or in my team, we'll do that for you for free. If, if you don't have analytics, we'll get that set up for you for free as well. So we we want to help people. Okay, so presuming you've got Analytics on your site, presuming you're using GA for not you a three or maybe some other analytics tool out there. What we need to do is really understand how are people using the website like I mentioned before, 40% ish are landing on your homepage. The rest are going deeper in your site when you go to Google, right? If you think about your usage, and you search for something, you don't want to land on the homepage of an organization then have to figure out oh, I need to go to here to here to here to here and then like five clicks later when Google wants to get you to the content that is most relevant based on your search criteria. So what are those top pages? Is it clear what those pages are for? Why are people searching for those pages? And then what is the action? What is the CTA the call to action that we have on those pages for people to take? People don't like to read? I'm super guilty of this, I'll admit that. I like to kind of skim right. So is the page skimmable? Is it clear what you want people to do? If everything is kind of leaning you go, you know what? This isn't feeling? Right? It's not really, it's time for redesign. You've got to you've got it sorted out. And, you know, like, that's where we need to start is, here are the pages people are going to? What is it that that they're looking for? And can they find it?

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Two things that are popping up for me with this right away is, number one, when I'm looking at page traffic, is there like a time length of time that you recommend people pull that data? Like do we want to look back at the last year? Do we want to look the last year and then year over year? Like how what kind of timeframe do we want to take a look at that.

David Pisarek
Think it's good to look at your analytics, if you can every quarter, so every three months, if that's too often, at least once a year, you should be looking at your data. I know like this type of work is the proactive stuff. But a lot of organizations work in the reactive mode, there's fires kind of like burning all over the place. You need to deal with this. There's an event coming. We in nonprofit, I worked in nonprofits for about 16 years, I totally get it. There's like eight hats that everybody wears, because budgets are so tight, there aren't enough people. So really understanding what what is it that you're looking for? And how often should you be looking for it? So if you look at at a year's period of time, I think that that's a good section there. I wouldn't, I wouldn't be too concerned about like three or four years ago, a lot of there's been a lot of shifts, certainly since COVID, around how people use the web, a lot of people are using mobile devices now because they're sitting on their couch, or there's been certainly a huge increase in that as technology gets cheaper over the last three, four or five years as well. So yeah, taking a look. I would say if you can every quarter, at most, once a year, and the length of data should be whatever it is that you're looking at. Right. So if you want to track page, popular pages over time, you know, three month period is a good amount of time, if you're putting in regular time and effort into the content on your website. Yeah, I

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
think that's really good, too. Because even if you just have a simple Google Sheet that you're just tracking some core metrics, even just to put notes in there to be like, Okay, well, q1 is when we have our gala. So it makes sense that this page was ranking really high. But then, you know, six months later, it's not going to be showing up as much. That doesn't mean that the page isn't valuable. But there's a time sensitivity to that. So I think when you do it quarterly, it makes it easier for you to also make notes about certain things that have happened. So that when you go back and recall the data, you have that kind of story to tell about the ebbs and flows of some of those core pages that you're trying to track. But I want to jump back to the second thing that you said a little bit ago, that I think is also really important in reviewing your calls to action on the pages and making sure that people know what to do and that people aren't confused and that it's user friendly. I'd love your thoughts on because I think we get in our own heads. And we know a lot about what we do. But that doesn't mean that it's easy for other people to understand what we do. So do you recommend organizations maybe bring in like a random person, like, you know, not completely random, but somebody that you know, that maybe hasn't interacted with your website a whole lot? And ask them kind of their thoughts and feedback and kind of get out of your own way?

David Pisarek
You know, I think organizations tend to work in silos. Right. And we see things from our perspective, from the internal perspective. Yes, I think it's a really good idea to your point, to bring people in to do some user testing. There's people that come to your organization, whether it's in person virtually for programs and services that you might offer. If volunteers, maybe their students, maybe they're older, somewhere in the middle. You have people internally that work for your organization, maybe they don't look at your website have a lot so I think there's a lot of opportunity to bring maybe what I would call like a working group together to go hey, here's a task. I want you to find this on the website, go right and you can sit with them you can do via zoom, and just be like, you know, show was how you would get to this and this. And then you can see the path that they take and see, you know how easy or difficult it is for them to find it. There's something to be said for getting out of our own heads. And thinking from the end users perspective, they're the people that are coming to the site a lot. Right? So you might go to your website very frequently as an executive director or communications team or something like that. And you're probably feeling like, I'm sick of looking at this. Right. But that's not what the outside world necessarily feels or thinks about your website as well.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, well, and it's super interesting, because we're going through this with a client of ours right now, where, you know, we got a request to make a pretty massive edit on a on a page. And I was like, I never get to that information from that page, like I go this way. And a couple other people were like, well, we go this way. And I was like, Okay, well, before we make an investment in like shifting kind of some of the structure in the organization, let's talk to a handful, handful more people. And so that's what we did. Because I think, to your point, you know, with nonprofits tending to be more reactive, we also might get feedback from one or two people and be like, Oh, well, that's everybody. So I love this combination of taking a look at the analytics and how people are flowing through. Understanding that user experience is so important. So we want to still talk to users, and kind of marry those two things together, I think that can be really powerful.

David Pisarek
And if you're wondering how am I going to find people, you can put a survey questionnaire form up on your site, a little pop up, that says, hey, we're looking at feedback for our website, do you want to join us? A quick focus group, right? If you have any money to put towards it, you can offer like an Amazon gift card or a Starbucks gift card, or Tim Hortons or whatever kind of Walmart or whatever works for you, for being able to participate in it, people, you'd be surprised a lot of people would be willing to give like five or 10 minutes of their time to be part of something like that, you'd be able to get more people, if even if it's like a $5 something, right? It helps encourage them.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
But what a great volunteer opportunity also for people that want to give back to your organization, but maybe can't come like, you know, maybe they care about your organization, but they can't come physically to your location to do something. Or, you know, they don't live in your geographical area. Like, it's also a great way to just say, hey, we really could use your help. It's a volunteer, you know, way you could support our organization and helping us essentially raise more money online, because we're making this experience a whole lot better. So I think, yeah, I love all of that. Okay, so we're looking at our pages, we're kind of identifying, which are the top priority. What's kind of next in in the steps here?

David Pisarek
Yeah, so what I recommend to our clients, and to all of you that are that are here as well. Take a look at the analytics, that's the first place, the second thing you want to do is essentially make a spreadsheet of all the pages in your website, all the content, there's tools out there that you can scrape it all with, and create this giant spreadsheet, you might have a small site of like 1015 pages. We did this with one of our clients, they had 18 153 pages. Going back, I think there was like a decade of content in there. And what we did was we had conversations with them, we worked through the spreadsheet. And we said, You know what are in terms of our best practices, the current year, plus two years back is typically best practices. And with the exception, if there's any political or big donor, like news releases that you might need to keep to appease those people, keep those. But really like, anything, if if you are more research based organization, anything that's over three or four years old, probably isn't relevant anymore, right. So determine for yourself, what is the threshold that you're comfortable with, and then go through and identify all the stuff that you want to wipe out of the site. Once you've identified what you want to wipe out, you want to kind of correlate that to your analytics. Because if you're getting traffic to one of those older pieces of content, you want to keep that you want to rewrite it, you want to make sure it's updated. You want to create more content that's like that, because even if it's older, and it's getting a whole bunch of traffic, there's some kind of relevance to it. Right? And what we want to do is think of like Cloud mix of content, right? So here's your topic, what is other similar content that you can create around that that will help bring more traffic?

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Well, and I think this is great, too, because again, just like we've been talking about, we tend to get into our own heads. I think you and I have probably both published content that we have thought was just you know, this is a solid thing, like people are gonna love this. This is the best thing we've done. And it doesn't, you know, maybe doesn't land as well and then something else that maybe you didn't think people cared about as much all of a sudden just takes off right? So real understanding not just what you think people care about, but that and those analytics will really help you validate that. And I think that's even if you're not working on a website, refresh, I think that's just gold in general. If you're taking the time to invest in content, make sure it's stuff people care about.

David Pisarek
Yeah, right. That's, that's what's going to drive traffic into you organically, right? We care about Google. There's Bing, and there's Yahoo. And there's other search engines. But really, Google is the mega one that you want to try to go to everybody goes there. How can we optimize our content to show up better? What is the content people are looking for? Let's make more of that. Why wouldn't you want to make more content that people are looking for? Right? We want to drive that and we want to pull them in and get them familiar with our organization.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
And so when we think about our content in like a website, refresh thing, would that be kind of maybe taking a look at how we're organizing the content and making it easy for people to find stuff they care about, so that they can continue to, you know, go deeper into that trust, like, you know, so we can encourage ourselves as the industry expert on insert whatever topic your organization does? So are we kind of using that data and maybe reorganizing to make sure people can find what they need? more easily? And also, by removing all of the extra stuff? It just kind of makes it more clear?

David Pisarek
Yeah, exactly. So, you know, we want to declutter the website. Think of it like a spring cleaning, I guess, right? You want to, you want to declare the website, you want to make it easy for people to find what it is that they're looking for? You want to organize it? So after we do the spreadsheet, the next step would be site mapping. How do we want to organize all this stuff? How do we want to combine, merge, and shuffle it around for an easy to use navigation? Because some people will explore your website anyways? And then going from that you want to go into what's called information architecture. So what is it on the pages? What's the order of that content on that page? So think of your homepage, for example, you're getting 30 40% traffic there, you want to have that organized in a way that makes sense. Right? And maybe that's telling your story, how you help the impact, you're having programs and services ways to get in touch? Right? Maybe that's the order that you want. It might be different for every organization. But take a look at those top, you know, 10, 12, 15 pages of your site? What's information architecture on those pages? Is it hitting home? Is it doing what you want it to do?

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, and then how important is it also maybe backpedaling a little bit. But as we think about the information that we have on those pages, and kind of what we eliminate what we keep, you know, we do we also want to be tracking, okay, well, these are the top 10 pages on our website. And also like these are the pages that are converting better, like might that look a little bit different like the page. So like, for example, if we have two donation pages that are running on our website, maybe once for monthly donors and ones for one time gifts or other things, right? If we're getting less traffic to the monthly donor page, but it's converting better. We're getting more traffic to the other donation page, but it's not converting as well like, Would that also help us in the decision for how we organize the sitemap and the main navigation? And the content? Yeah, I think

David Pisarek
it's very common for what for Nonprofits and Charities to have a donate button at the top. Right. And if you're pushing people for donating, my recommendation is to try to get monthly donors instead of annual like one time donations, because over time, it'll end up being more money for for your pool of resources, right. So that's the first thing I would push people to the page, obviously, that's converting better, but do some AP testing with it as well. Right, you can take a page depending on how your site is built. And you can do some AV testing, maybe around the color, maybe around the wording, it could be the placement of the call to action on the page once they actually when they're in one kind of like golden rule that that I like to tell all of our clients and I'll fill you all in right now. Keep your donation form as simple as possible. If you can get away with like three fields for donation form, go for it. If you can integrate some kind of like automated like Apple pay Google Pay Pay Pal, something like that, where it just eliminates asking them for their name and everything. That's even more ideal, right? If you are the gold standard, be like a one click donation, right? You don't have to. You don't have to ask them for all kinds of information. You can build their profile out later. Right right now you want to hit them while they're thinking of making a donation because they're on that page already.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
I love that and you're speaking my language. I think gone are the days of just sending people to a page I'll link like, it's so easy on any website platform to have an embedded donation page that's clean and simple. So I love that you brought that up, because I think that's a game changer in trust, building trust with people that are landing on your website. So we only have a few minutes left. So I want to make sure that we hit on kind of all of the other kind of criteria that you like to consider kind of, you know, as you're thinking about this website refresh. So, you know, if you, you've got your pages, you're working on your information, like all of this stuff is done, sometimes in conjunction with a consultant, but could also kind of be done on your own before you even get to the point of making any actual changes to your pages, right.

David Pisarek
I think there's a lot that that you can do internally, you can do some surveys, you can do some soul searching on your own as well. Like, if you go to your website, and you're looking for something in like, what's your gut reaction to it? Does it feel like it's right? Take a look at other organizations. I know that we all like to think that our organization is unique, and we are special, and we help these people and nobody else does this. There's another organization out there that's doing what you're doing. Right? Go to Google search for them. Right? If you're focused on pediatric health care, right? Go to Google search for pediatric pediatric health care in maybe another city, another country? Right. There are other organizations that right, take a look at what they're doing, versus what you're doing. Does it resonate? Does their site look better than yours? Does it feel better? Does it? Are you still like, oh, you know, like ours is ours is better. So I think it's important to get like an internal sense of of tone for that. And that can help kind of guide your process as you go through a redesign. Right. So when we think of a redesign, we think of Oh, like the branding, the colors, the style, but it's also the content and the messaging, and a lot of people kind of forget about that. You need to be able to tell your story evoke some kind of emotion, to appeal to people to get them to want to engage with you.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, I always say that the design helps with the scroll to stop people. So they can easily find the content that they care the most about not to, like, tell us the design doesn't tell the story, right? The design gets people to where they, like helps them just kind of manipulate the website and scroll and get to the information that they care about. Yeah, I love that. Okay. So you know, real quickly, if we're thinking of, if we're to the point where we're like, Okay, we've got all this stuff together, we know we want to do we do want to go through with a redesign? Do we need to like just do the whole website from scratch? Can we do one page at a time, kind of how you know, and I guess a lot of that does come down to budget in timeline, but any thoughts or recommendations about how we can process making these updates and not kind of be overwhelmed by all of the changes that may need to happen?

David Pisarek
is a great question. We're working through one of our longer term clients right now exactly with this. So we built the site for them. In 2020, they have a 50th anniversary coming up. So they want to like revamp it. But the approach that we're taking with them is a phased approach. So we're going to build up some pages in advance to talk about the 50th anniversary, we're going to kind of not redesign their website, but refine some pieces of it. So like on their homepage, instead of what we call like the Big Hero section that is that, you know, pretty popular design trend, we're going to swap that out with something else. So it's not really a redesign. It's more like putting in some new revised content that will speak to it. And then we're gonna go through a redesign with them for their big like, 50th anniversary launch.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Yeah, that's great. Well, and especially if you're not doing a full rebrand, it's easier to kind of manipulate it as you go. Right? I think the trickier part is if you are doing a full like full rebrand, then sometimes it can look weird to change some pieces here and there. But I think that's super smart. What you're doing I love that, and especially if you have a larger website, way less overwhelming to kind of tackle it by your biggest priority, right? Like, what is the thing that we need to make sure we're communicating as the biggest priority?

David Pisarek
Yeah, I think one of the other things that might help you walk through Do you want to redesign is what are the pain points that you're experiencing with your website? Is it hard to update? Are you able to update it? Do you need to know like HTML coding, or is there a page builder is a page builder, easy to use or difficult to use? Is it broken? I know there's a lot of themes that you can buy for word WordPress powers like 40% 43% of the web or something like that. There's themes that you can buy for relevant, relatively cheap, like 50 $60. But they're built using old versions of page builders, and there's security risks and things like that as well. And I think that that's something that's important kind of like from a geeky standpoint to make sure that you've identified are there any security risks that we need to mitigate as we move forward with the website? I don't want anybody out there to spend money on something that is, is a known security risk, let's, and the biggest problem is if you upgrade the builder, the site basically breaks because it needs to be redone in a different way. So do we switch builders to something else? Right? What does that process look like? If you're on a really large website, it can take it can be a really big process, an undertaking to do. And

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
we're looking at number of downloads and last date updated, right? When we're looking at themes for like, what version of WordPress it's compatible with, right? It's pretty easy to see those data points on on anything you're thinking of purchasing for WordPress before, you know to make sure that it's going to last.

David Pisarek
Yeah, absolutely. If anybody has any questions like, feel free to reach out to happy to, like provide you with a free consult to talk through some of that if you want. Yeah.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Well, David, you and I could talk about websites all day long. Is there any kind of last words of advice that you would want to share with people that are kind of considering taking a peek at their website and making any updates?

David Pisarek
The best piece of advice that I that I think I can give you is actually do something, take some kind of action today or tomorrow, whether it's looking at your website, talking with a colleague, or just you know, flipping through and looking at and going okay, here's here's how I actually really feel about it. pretending that I'm somebody outside of the organization that isn't familiar with it, you need to actually take some kind of action, put one foot in front of another, you'll create that snowball. And eventually you will get to a place where either you've done it yourself, you've brought somebody in, you've got a volunteer or students, somebody that's helping you improve where you're at. So good.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
David, if people want to connect with you chat with you learn more about your your company about digital, how do they do that?

David Pisarek
The easiest thing is to go to wowdigital.com. Alternatively, there is a link on there a clear call to action to book a free consult. So you can do that right there. Or you can send me an email David@wowdigital.com.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Love that. And we will have everything linked up in the show notes at the first click.net/258. David, this has been a wonderful conversation. Thank you so much for joining me today.

David Pisarek
My pleasure. Happy to come back anytime.

Sami Bedell-Mulhern
Okay, so what do you think? Are you ready to take fresh eyes to your website to take a look to look at your analytics to kind of figure everything out and see if it's time to make an update. You can grab the show notes for this episode, like I mentioned at the first click.net/258. I look forward to seeing you there. So you connect with David and get all of the amazing resources that he shared. But for now, take a look at your website, have some other people take a look at your website and make sure that it's working for you and supporting you in your business. If you liked this episode and some of the other episodes that you've listened to please make sure you click that subscribe button wherever you're listening. Or if you're watching on our YouTube channel at Digital Marketing therapy. I would love to make sure you get notified every time there's a new episode. They're released weekly. And I am just grateful that you take the time to listen to our podcast and help us support other nonprofits just like you that are struggling with their digital marketing strategies for now, thanks for listening, and I'll see you in the next one.

 

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